Our six favorite local songs from July

Jul 28, 2016 at 3:52 pm
Our six favorite local songs from July
Temulent  — “Death Peddler” (featuring Sloe Pink) The incessant plod of the drums is part and parcel to drum and bass, a subset of electronic music that delivers what it advertises. With “Death Peddler,” Temulent lays thick beats — the bass- and snare-heavy style prone to turn on a dime. Joined by the undeniable Sloe Pink — who turns in an incredible performance that showcases his skill as an emcee and someone equally capable of making hard turns — leans into something different than any of his available output. His flow is damn near a thing of mechanized beauty, a furious blend of dancehall and hip-hop that fits seamlessly with this track. If you told me this dude was Robocop, I’d believe it, because he spits fire like he’s fighting ED-209. And yes, I would buy that for a dollar. Exister — “Sea of Selfishness” When some think of ’90s throwback music, it’s usually with a nostalgia for dubious fashion and the kind of radio hits that informed your school dance. For others, though, ’90s throwback gets into that weird intersection of metal, hardcore and indie rock — the kind of thing that put a band like Neurosis on the map. Exister does just that, with visceral metal grooves that go hard at the breakdown with palm mutes and pinch harmonics. The sound feeds into that angsty aggression that we’ve all known at one time or another, and the sort that makes you want to holler along in the car and pump your fists. There are a lot of rough edges on this demo, but you can easily get what they’re going for, and it works wonderfully. Hot Prowlers — “Memphis” It’s hard to not get this song stuck in your head. It’s been in my head for about a week now. At first I couldn’t recall who it was, and my brain went to The Cure or Interpol, something like that, before circling back to the Hot Prowlers, who with “Memphis,” have crafted a nice piece of new wave punk rock. This is a catchy song with fantastic bass and guitar melodic interplay, danceable drums and the wonderful voice, Foxie Gogo. On a meta level, this band tends to lean hard into their ’80s appreciation. But rather than calling up pictures of the beach or people wearing fly blazers, there is something much darker here that gives the track a sense of urgency. This feels cathartic in some way, but manages that heaviness with a deft hand. Rmllw2llz — “Soul 2025” (featuring Eons D and Otis Junior) Rmllw2llz has a fine new album titled Nu Growf out now, and it is righteous. Rmllw2llz spits over a beat that has elements of soul and funk, with a little of that patented Louisville melancholia underscoring the music. Is something sinister coming? I couldn’t tell you that, but this track has a boss line up that features Eons D and Otis Junior, who leads the track off, and who may very well have provided the keys here, as it certainly sounds like his style. Rmllw2llz has a wonderful delivery that channels rappers like Busta Rhymes or either emcee in Blackalicious. That gruffness of tone in Rmllw2llz’s voice is wonderfully complemented by the dulcet crooning from Otis Junior, and the smooth tenor flow of Eons D. Don’t sleep on it. Rosario — “What Do You Wanna Do” (produced by NF Records) I couldn’t begin to tell you the first thing about Rosario, but the low-key trap work, chill samples in the beat and that swing in his flow tells me all I need to know. There is plenty of Drake or something like that going on — that kind of mainstream vibe that I remain largely ignorant towards, but with a strangely beguiling undercurrent. It’s hard to put a finger on the cypher that is Rosario, but this track is solid with great hooks and a memorable beat. This song is durable on repeat listens, and, although it is a short track, it feels ideal in length to communicate the message. Eons D & Jordan Jetson — “Forever” (featuring 1200) Just so you know, Eons D is on fire this month. The closer to Inner Space, the newest from Eons and Jetson, “Forever” is a top banger that’s just too dope not to mention here or anywhere.1200 carries the entire intro to this track, and, unsurprisingly, kills it. At the midway mark, the beat turns up a notch and in comes the title pair. D and Jetson work well together both in terms of lyricism and the tonality to their delivery and it’s magic. There is a Stankonia vibe to this song that features clever changes, each of which compliment the work of the emcee performing.