Photo Set: Beatersville

Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Kenny Hoerter Sr. sits by his car at the Beatersville Car and Bike show. Hoerter owns a shop in Butchertown where he keeps his pristine hotrods and memorabilia from as early as the 1940’s. “I just like lookin’ in the past I guess.”
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Beatersville
Kimberly Petree aka Pearle De Lux stands by her table for the Greaser Gals Garage where she sells t-shirts and also her hand made jewelry and hair bows. “It’s originally a bunch of us girls that are learning how to work on our own cars. I’ve got a 1953 Chevy Bel Air I work on, and my business partner has a 69 Chevelle. I have some other friends that have newer Jeeps and Camaros, and we just kind of have our own thing… It’s almost like a social club, and we like to go to the different events and travel around to look at cars.”
Derrin Pickett of Evansville, Indiana poses beside his large Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer sign next to his display tables at the Beatersville Car and Bike Show. Pickett says that he sets up about four or five times a year at different car shows with his beer and car memorabilia. “I kinda dig on it. I used to be all toys, like the hot-wheels, action figures and stuff. I did this show back in 09’ and the guy next to me was selling all of this cool beer stuff. I see that stuff all the time at garage sales and good will, and I just didn’t know there was a market for it. But it’s this young hipster crowd.”
Beatersville
Beatersville
“When the radiator builds up a whole lot of heat, it’ll circulate some of the antifreeze out into a tank on a newer car ya know, and then when it cools down it kinda circulates back in. So it’s called an overflow tank. But I mean these radiators don’t really have an overflow tank, and you don’t want some big plastic thing hanging out there, so that’s what that is” said Steve Welch of New Albany when describing the purpose of the Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer can on his 1930 Model A Ford. “I found that a long time ago, put that on there for my dad who passed away when I was young.”
Lucy Dunham stands by her 1953 American Flyer that she outfitted with a speaker system for her iPod shuffle with the help of her uncle, Tommy Knappenberger. Dunham also included on her bicycle a horn and a trusty stash container behind the seat to keep her candy and beef jerky.
Beatersville
Beatersville

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