Staff Picks

Andrew Rinehart | The New Vintage | Friday, December 26
Andrew Rinehart | The New Vintage | Friday, December 26

Friday, December 26th Andrew Rinehart The New Vintage 2126 S. Preston St., 749-4050 newvintagelouisville.com $7; 8 p.m. Andrew Rinehart has come a long way. Starting out as the lead vocalist in a local hardcore punk band, Rinehart has developed a solo career that couldn’t be any further removed. Equal parts tender and snarky, there is just as much playfulness in his music as nuance and beauty. It’s clear that Rinehart has worn many hats, as evidenced over the course of his three-part EP series, “Everything (Parts I, II, and III)”, that sees the performer playing pithy pop music and delicate singer-song writer pieces all within the context of one album. Now a resident of Los Angeles, Rinehart is making a special stop in town over the holidays for a rare performance at the New Vintage alongside the sublimely delightful Dane Waters, and the plodding indie of New Mother Nature. —Syd Bishop

SATURDAY, DEC. 27 Black Birds of Paradise Zanzabar 2100 S. Preston St., 635-9227 zanzabarlouisville.com $5; 9 p.m. Modern psychedelia that relies on sharp melodies as much as it does a subtle ambient touch, the music that Black Birds of Paradise plays is freewheeling and spacey, but, at the same time, it has drive and backbone. It’s both expansive and cohesive; it keeps you on your toes, but the central instrumental themes stay constant enough to make sense. And that’s what works about it; it would be easy for them to fall into the redundancies and cliches that so many experimental bands do, but they keep things interesting and challenging. At the same time, it’s a hell of lot of fun to listen to. New Bravado and Monolith open. —Scott Recker

SATURDAY, DEC. 27 Stu Allen and Owsley County Headliners 1386 Lexington Rd., 584-8088 headlinerslouisville.com $10; 9 p.m. The Grateful Dead are one of those bands — love them or hate them — that to cover properly, you have to devote a sizable portion of your life to. And many of the members of Stu Allen and Owsley County, which features players from Dark Star Orchestra and Forgotten Space, have went all in throughout the years. The Dead were an intricate band with distinct styles and voices, something that’s hard to pay tribute to without diluting or trampling, but these guys have it down to a science — giving respect where it’s due and building and exploring their way through the songs just like Jerry, Phil, Bob and the rest did all those years ago. —Scott Recker

SATURDAY, DEC. 27 Stu Allen and Owsley County Headliners 1386 Lexington Rd., 584-8088 headlinerslouisville.com $10; 9 p.m. The Grateful Dead are one of those bands — love them or hate them — that to cover properly, you have to devote a sizable portion of your life to. And many of the members of Stu Allen and Owsley County, which features players from Dark Star Orchestra and Forgotten Space, have went all in throughout the years. The Dead were an intricate band with distinct styles and voices, something that’s hard to pay tribute to without diluting or trampling, but these guys have it down to a science — giving respect where it’s due and building and exploring their way through the songs just like Jerry, Phil, Bob and the rest did all those years ago. —Scott Recker

SATURDAY, DEC. 27 Stu Allen and Owsley County Headliners 1386 Lexington Rd., 584-8088 headlinerslouisville.com $10; 9 p.m. The Grateful Dead are one of those bands — love them or hate them — that to cover properly, you have to devote a sizable portion of your life to. And many of the members of Stu Allen and Owsley County, which features players from Dark Star Orchestra and Forgotten Space, have went all in throughout the years. The Dead were an intricate band with distinct styles and voices, something that’s hard to pay tribute to without diluting or trampling, but these guys have it down to a science — giving respect where it’s due and building and exploring their way through the songs just like Jerry, Phil, Bob and the rest did all those years ago. —Scott Recker

THROUGH JAN. 8 ‘FOUR LTTR WRDS: New Art by BBASS’ Revelry Boutique Gallery 742 E. Market St., 414-1ART revelrygallery.com Words have power, meaning and an ocean of depth. Even the most simple ones. In his new show, “FOUR LTTR WRDS,” artist Brandon Bass (BBASS for short) explores this depth by taking the simple and showing us its true complexity. Using cutouts from print advertisements from the ‘50s and ‘60s, and then combining them with a word consisting of only four letters, BBASS uses collage techniques to define through visual cues. Spread across 50 works, each piece explores the deeper and complex meanings behind the simple and forces you to look at what a word actually says, how it is used and the depth in which it reaches. Go see BBASS’s visual dictionary and find yourself redefining the simple. —Chasson Higdon

THROUGH JAN. 30 ‘ARCHITECTOPLYPLAST: Debrided Surfaces’ galerie hertz 1253 S. Preston St., 581-8277 galeriehertz.com There are no ways to make the words “urban decay” sound like something we want. Yet the mixed media constructions of Jim Doiron have an exciting feel to them. Doiron states that he is “an artist working in construction materials, trying to make materials not meant for purely aesthetic pursuits aesthetic nonetheless.” How does he do that? Billy Hertz of galerie hertz has the answer, explaining that Doiron has a “fastidious attention to the tiniest details, [a] subtle use of color [with] his well honed sense of juxtaposing this to that.” Juxtaposition is the key to understanding Doiron’s art or, more accurately, what seemingly lies beneath. His use of “debrided surfaces,” the removal of one layer to reveal another, makes one curiouser and curiouser. —Jo Anne Triplett

THROUGH JAN. 30 ‘ARCHITECTOPLYPLAST: Debrided Surfaces’ galerie hertz 1253 S. Preston St., 581-8277 galeriehertz.com There are no ways to make the words “urban decay” sound like something we want. Yet the mixed media constructions of Jim Doiron have an exciting feel to them. Doiron states that he is “an artist working in construction materials, trying to make materials not meant for purely aesthetic pursuits aesthetic nonetheless.” How does he do that? Billy Hertz of galerie hertz has the answer, explaining that Doiron has a “fastidious attention to the tiniest details, [a] subtle use of color [with] his well honed sense of juxtaposing this to that.” Juxtaposition is the key to understanding Doiron’s art or, more accurately, what seemingly lies beneath. His use of “debrided surfaces,” the removal of one layer to reveal another, makes one curiouser and curiouser. —Jo Anne Triplett