‘Smoketown, 
1865-2015’

Neighborhoods with descriptive names tell a little bit about their history. Smoketown’s name supposedly came from the area’s brickyard kilns that gave off a lot of smoke. Following that reasoning, it’s easy to understand why a small portion of the area was also known as Frogtown (the clay pits attracted frogs). Smoketown, the oldest historically African American neighborhood in Louisville, is celebrating its sesquicentennial with an exhibition of photographs. The images in “Smoketown, 1865-2015” came from many sources, including UofL’s Photographic Archives and Smoketown residents. The opening is during the Jan. 1 First Friday Trolley Hop at 5-8 p.m. There will also be another reception on Sunday, Jan. 17 at 2-4 p.m. that coincides with Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend.

JAN. 1 – 31

Wayside Expression Gallery - Wayside Christian Mission
120 W. Broadway St
836-7661
http://waysidechristianmission.org

About the Author

‘Smoketown, 
1865-2015’

Jo Anne Triplett is the contributing visual arts editor at LEO Weekly. She’s a past member of the Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Public Art, was the content advisor on the Glassworks Building video, and has written for Louisville Magazine, Kentucky Homes and Gardens and the national publication Glass Craftsman. Jo Anne came to Louisville from Washington, D.C. where she worked as a researcher and writer for the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

 

 

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