#JusticeForBreonna: Artists show support in images and words

As protests sparked by the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor continue throughout Louisville, Louisville artists are channeling their creativity to memorialize those who have lost their lives at the hands of Louisville Metro Police Department and state Department of Corrections. On Saturday, June 13, Black Lives Matter Louisville, Stand Up Sunday and artists gathered outside of The MAMMOTH from 5 to 10 p.m. for a community art build. They created posters and stickers displaying in words and images their support for Black Lives Matter and promoting racial justice. The group asked LEO that they not be identified in photographs because it could lead to them being doxxed online.

One artist painted a portrait of then 16-year-old Gynnya McMillen, who died in 2016 while in the Lincoln Village Detention Center in Hardin County. Three employees were fired in connection with the state investigation, two of then indicted on a misdemeanor charge of official misconduct, according to The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting.
Portraits of Breonna Taylor could be found all throughout the outdoor space where the art build was held.
Artists worked on a large banner with a portrait of Breonna Taylor at the community art build.
Signs were made for David “YaYa” McAtee who was killed by the Kentucky National Guard on June 1 at his barbecue stand.
A large banner with a portrait of Breonna Taylor was created with the statement: “They tried to bury me. They didn’t know I was a seed.”
Artists used a variety of materials to create their pieces.
A large banner with a portrait of Breonna Taylor was created with the statement: “They tried to bury me. They didn’t know I was a seed.”
Darnell Wicker, 57, was shot 14 times and killed on Aug. 8, 2016, by two Louisville police officers responding to a domestic violence call in southwestern Louisville. The offcers were exonerated of any wrongdoing in a police investigation, although one broke department rules by not turning on his body camera, The Courier Journal reported. The city settled a federal lawsuit brought by Wicker’s family for $1.25 million.
Artists made posters, banners and stickers in support of Black Lives Matter and racial justice.

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