Thorns & Roses: The worst, best and most absurd (11/28)

First, do no harm  |  Rose & Thorn 

A rose goes to the Kentucky Supreme Court and a thorn to the Kentucky Medical Association. The court found unconstitutional a 2017 state law that forced you to file medical malpractice cases with a panel before suing. The chief justice cited the state Constitution: “All courts shall be open, and every person for an injury done to him in his lands, goods, person or reputation, shall have remedy by due course of law, and right and justice administered without sale, denial or delay.” The KMA said voiding the law leaves “our system more susceptible to higher costs and frivolous lawsuits.” Read: It is easier to sue docs for fuck-ups.

Paradise lost  |  Thorn 

We are not a fan of an effort to name the Barret and Winter avenues corridor as the Paradise District.  It has a nice ring, but it references Lynn’s Paradise Cafe, which tended to leave a bad taste literally and then figuratively as the building sat vacant for years. Now, finally, that stretch of Barret is rebounding. Someone suggested The Barret District. Not as catchy, but…

Advertisement

Gotta love a good fart joke  |  Rose

We also are not a fan of graffiti (yes, Banksy may be the exception, but, then, he is making political art, not just pissing on walls). Still, we are amused by the renaming of Urban Outfitters on Bardstown Road.

Urban Outfitters on Bardstown Road. (Photo by Tony Geraghty)

And… love us longform  |  Rose 

It is nice to be recognized. The venerable longreads.com, which boasts “the best longform stories on the web,” selected “eight excellent stories discovered in U.S. alt-weekly newspapers.” One of them is LEO Weekly’s piece by Lisa Pisterman, “Who is the real ‘Lady in Blue’ of Seelbach Hotel?” Longreads noted: “Around the country, alt-weeklies continue to publish deep investigations, irreverent features, and weird columns that you just don’t find in other publications, often by promising young writers who are discovering their voices.” To find all eight of the stories, search for “longreads and alternative reality.” 

Comments