LEON: McConnell accuses Obamacare of sexually violating hospitals

During Monday’s Senate candidate debate, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell leveled a new accusation against Obamacare. Citing reductions in Medicare reimbursements to hospitals, McConnell said, “Our hospitals are being rimracked by these Medicare reimbursement reductions.”

It is unclear at this point where and when the alleged act took place. 

According to a dictionary definition, “rimrack” is defined as, “a sexual act in which one partner licks/sucks/nibbles/etc. his or her partner’s butthole.”

White House spokesperson Josh Earnest responded to the accusations by stating the legislation’s history of supporting hospitals: “Obamacare has created new incentives for hospitals that should reduce readmissions and make life easier for them.”

Obamacare opponents have long warned against the legislation’s efforts to screw hospitals, citing a 2013 Kaiser article finding nearly 1,500 transgressions against hospitals for one reason or another. However, defenders of Obamacare are pointing to McConnell’s long history of accusing legislative reforms of rimracking. 

In a March 2001 interview with Wolf Blitzer on CNN’s “Inside Politics,” McConnell stated, “I don’t think anybody is totally comfortable with being perceived as against reform. In fact, this is an absurd bill that rimracks the parties and doesn’t take a penny out of politics.” An uncomfortable Blitzer did not follow up on the accusation. 

On the Senate floor on July 15, 2004, McConnell claimed that he, himself, had been a victim of rimracking: “So it occurred to this Senator back in 1998 when we were considering another tobacco proposal that it was time for a buyout … I was rimracked — rimracked — by the two big newspapers in my state.” Then, an emotional McConnell said the villains of blamed him, the victim. He continued, “They said I turned my back on Kentucky culture; I had gone Washington; I had been up there so long I had forgotten what it was like in the hollows and the tobacco fields of Kentucky.” So, he contends, the papers gave him a good ol’ fashioned rimracking reminder (cue dueling banjos).

Charges were never brought against the two Kentucky papers or the aforementioned legislation.