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Unfair housing

Action plan recaps decades of racial segregation in neighborhoods — and shows the path to ending it

In 1954, when Andrew Wade and his wife, Charlotte, wanted to move their family to the booming Louisville suburbs, their race proved too big a barrier to overcome.

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Grimes and riddles

Grimes’ campaign is picking up momentum, but is not being Mitch McConnell enough?

Congressman John Yarmuth stood before a crowd of more than 1,000 in Louisville’s West End last Thursday, delivering welcome breaking news before introducing the woman

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Eight minutes with the woman who could ditch Mitch

Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes sat down with LEO Weekly for eight minutes last Thursday to discuss several policy issues facing Kentucky and the nation.

Inbox — Feb. 5, 2014

Letters to the Editor

Visible Leap

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Black-box retail

West End activists call for transparency on rumored Walmart deal

On the blistering cold morning of Martin Luther King Jr.

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The Butchertown battle sizzles once more

JBS Swift and Butchertown neighbors renew fight over slaughterhouse permits

Louisville’s Butchertown neighborhood is used to the all-too-familiar odors emanating from the 10,000 hogs meeting their demise daily at the JBS Swift slaughterhouse,

Inbox — Feb. 12, 2014

Letters to the Editor

Kudos for Context

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Waging a fight

The battle to raise the minimum wage flares up in Kentucky

Lyn Riley has just walked home through the snow to her tiny one-bedroom apartment in Louisville’s Smoketown neighborhood after

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Hope for the homeless

Louisville is making big gains on the fight to end homelessness

 Two years ago, volunteers with the annual homeless street count found 150 people tucked away in those places that are easy to forget about — alleyways, overpasses and tents alongside th

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Open arms

A conversation with Jamie Tworkowski, founder of the nonprofit To Write Love on Her Arms

It all started with a girl. Her name was Renee. It was 2006. She was a cocaine addict, depressed, a cutter who’d carved the words “fuck up” into her arm with a razor.