LEO Weekly welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. E-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia: Letters to the Editor

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or

Erosia (Letters to the Editor)

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia (Letters to the Editor)

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia: Letters to the Editor

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia: Letters to the Editor

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia: Letters to the Editor

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia: Letters to the Editor

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.CorrectionStephen George’s story about the future of public housing in Louisville (LEO, Aug. 16) said that Gordon Stoudemire pays no rent for his subsidized apartment. In fact, he pays $198 per month. LEO regrets the error.Northup ‘Cutting’ and ‘Running’It seems that Rep. Northup not only voted to cut veterans benefits, but now she is running away from her record. The vote that we MoveOn members are using to cite her hypocrisy of cutting benefits while sending our service men and women to war is sound. The controversial vote generated major news in 2005 when the budget resolution passed, primarily along party lines, by 218 to 213.Budget resolutions lay the framework for spending; they are the benchmark for setting the budget figures by the appropriations committee each year. This budget resolution contained reconciliation orders that specifically required the House Veterans’ Affairs (VA) Committee to cut benefits by $155 million in a year or to tax veterans by increasing their fees. The budget resolution is a blueprint for the budget process, and Rep. Northup was wrong to vote to cut $798 million from veterans’ benefits.Rep. Northup also voted against two amendments that sought to provide additional funds for veterans in the budget resolution. Politicians can try to remedy their bad votes later (as Rep. Northup is claiming), but the fact remains that in 2005, she voted to cut veterans’ benefits while sending our troops to war.  Kentucky’s veterans deserve better.We will continue to hold her accountable. Our response to Northup’s claim (budget resolutions don’t appropriate money and MoveOn is lying) is: Northup is “cutting” and then “running” from her record. She voted for a budget resolution, an important benchmark in the budget process, which cut veterans’ benefits by $798 million over the next five years, while voting to send our troops to war. That’s wrong and the people in KY03 deserve to know she’s been caught red-handed.Mike BaileyKentucky MoveOn CoordinatorLocal LoveThe recent commentary by Michelle Manker, “Where is the local love?” (LEO, Aug. 16) is an absolute wake-up call for us all. If we value the diversity and unique qualities of our local businesses, we owe to them to patronize them above all others.Many local businesses offer products and services that are qualitatively above what we find at big-box, franchise and chain stores. They are also business people who are our neighbors and fellow local taxpayers who support the local community directly through contributions of not only money but of time and effort as well. We need to seek them out and give them our support with our purchases.Sure, you can save a nickel at Wal-Mart, but what is the real cost when we find that our favorite restaurant or local hardware store has closed its doors? Will the CEO of Home Depot be coaching our Little League teams? And will he have his VPs baking for the church bazaar? I’ll bet not.Support your local small businesses. They deserve it!Bruce HerdtOpen the Red Door!What a sad day, unbelievable, I am shocked: The Red Lounge on Frankfort Avenue has closed its doors. The ultimate non-mainstream bar in Louisville. The perfect hangout for those like me who refuse to wear stupid colored plastic bracelets and — excuse me, please! — do not want to be asked for their ID when ordering a beer. I loved to go to the Red Lounge, I loved to take people there. Why did this lounge close? What do I have to tell you, dear owner, to consider a re-opening? Do I have to tell the other people to go there? Does it help if I tell you that I compared the Red Lounge to those cool hangouts in Zurich and Munich where I used to go to (I am European)? The Red Lounge in Munich or Zurich: It would be the absolute “in” place. Americans would look for (and love!) such a bar in Europe or wherever in the world. Why not here in Louisville? Students, college graduates, snow boarders, engineers, freaks from the neighborhood, late-night working people … these people live in Louisville, too. There is no substitute in Louisville for the Red Lounge. The old gas station, the train tracks outside, located on Frankfort Avenue — everything is just perfect. Nothing needs to be changed for a re-opening, absolutely nothing, just unlock the door, please! The local love is here!Doro RosenbergerWe Are Keepin’ It LocalMichelle Manker blamed the closing of three local businesses — Mayan Gypsy, Red Lounge and Lentini’s — on a lack of support from locals (LEO, Aug. 16). According to quotes from the owners published in The Courier-Journal, the Mayan Gypsy and the Red Lounge closed not due to a lack of support, but because their owners wanted to do other things for awhile. Mayan Gypsy owner Bruce Ucan was quoted as saying his lease was up and, “I need to take a break.” He also was quoted as saying he was considering opening another restaurant. In another C-J article, Red Lounge owner Andy Blieden said his partner Bea  Chamberlain was leaving the country for awhile and, since the building was for sale, it was a “good time for a transition.” He also said the location would have a “nice, new restaurant soon” and that the “... restaurant will be something cool, I can assure you.”These do not sound like owners beaten down by empty tables and a lack of community support. Instead of Ms. Manker jumping into a tired old rant about how the big bad chains are squashing all the local businesses, she should have talked to the owners of restaurants that have been mainstays in this community for years ... Cunningham’s, Ramsi’s, Kunz’s, Vincenzo’s, The Bristol, Artemisia, Lynn’s, Café Mimosa, City Café, Uptown Café, Third Avenue Café, Irish Rover, Café Metro, Twig & Leaf, Asiatique, Jack Fry’s, Jade Palace, Bearno’s, Azalea’s, Genny’s, Kim’s, Nancy’s Bagels, etc. Not to mention the local restaurants that have gone big-time ... Papa John’s, Tumbleweed, Texas Roadhouse, etc. Louisville has a rich tradition of great local restaurants supported by locals and visitors alike. It is good to point out the locally owned choices available — as LEO does each week in the HotBytes and Aftertastes sections. Maybe Ms. Manker should try reading these before she decides to write another undeserved smackdown of the locals.David HarpeMakin’ It FunkyAs a lifelong resident of this city, I know what a good place Louisville is, but like a lot of other cities our size, we always seem just this side of greatness. Louisville’s a place where it feels like something big is always about to happen, but it never does. What’s the problem? It’s just not a cool place to live, nor are we funky enough.Oh, we’ve got a lot of cool and a good deal of funk. The performing arts scene is superb, the aboveground arts scene is intriguing, the underground arts scene is vibrant. I don’t know much about the music scene, but from what I’ve seen, there’s promise. We have a string of neat festivals. Our downtown is finally waking up. The restaurant scene is amazing.What we lack is the kind of funky coolness that put Seattle on the map. It’s the kind of funky coolness you find in New Orleans (which invented it) or San Francisco, Savannah, Portland and a handful of other cities. (Key West is no longer cool or funky: too many T-shirt shops.)How do you make a city cool and funky? You can’t. You either are or you’re not. But with the right political and cultural leadership, you can encourage what’s already here.The Rolling Stones at Churchill Downs is a great start, but we need more funky events like that. Otherwise, we’re always going to be what we’ve always been: one of the greatest overlooked cities in the nation.David Williams

Erosia

Tear Sheet ResponseI read with interest the story “City Hall 2.0.” (Tear Sheet, LEO Aug. 2) and wondered why no one took the time to ask Metro Council Democrats why they were doing what was done with regard to the Arena project.For some time now, it has been reported the Mayor saved the Arena deal. He was forced to veto a resolution and then put everything back on track with a new Memorandum of Agreement (MOA).Metro Council Democrats have been criticized for allegedly giving labor unions too much power and wanting to derail the Arena project.