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LEO Weekly welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. E-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.Christmas PastsAttn: Rebecca Haithcoat:Have you seen “Tuna Christmas” in previous years? After seeing last Sunday’s performance (at Actors Theatre), I sent a letter to (ATL artistic director) Marc Masterson, giving my family’s critique of this year’s incarnation of one of our holiday favorites. Having attended just about every year, we’ve watched a lot of fluctuations in casting, content and tempo. This was the first year we’ve come away less than satisfied, and I was interested to note that you also found the pacing tedious. The show’s length has varied over the years as cast members’ improvisations and ad libs influenced the overall length. It’s not the show’s plot that made it seem long this year; it was the characters’ failure to capitalize on the possibilities. In past years, a highlight of the show has always been the scene featuring the two old ladies. Previous actors were able to capture in perfect and hilarious detail the mannerisms and foibles of these golden-age sweethearts. There’s never been a karate scuffle, nor did it enhance the scene for us. Didi Snavely’s monologue also missed the mark this year (no pun intended). It dragged on, and its best moments were somehow repetitive rather than amusing. As for the second act — well, when properly done, it’s a very important part of the plot, as it shows how each character’s Christmas wish is fulfilled. The intermission seems unnecessary — but my family decided they needed the extra time to stuff the actors into those waitress costumes!As for “Christmas Carol” — this will be our 37th consecutive year to watch it. It’s essential to our holiday plans. And believe me, the staging has fluctuated a LOT over those years. In one recent year, the overall effect was a gloomy downer of a show. The next year (they must have had a lot of feedback) came a delightful, sparkling version. So don’t despair; if it’s mediocre this year, next year should be better! Our chief complaint for the past two years has been the decision to introduce the Ghost of Christmas Present in an offstage room, eliminating the splendid spectacle of his throne!Thanks for letting me vent.Anne Miller, New Albany

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.Media MaydayRick Redding’s media analysis was on target (LEO, Nov. 7). Local media have become so lazy in their “scripted teleprompter” news that viewers’ interest has waned. The same “old” faces appear on screen with the same demeanor of the past 20 years. Fresh faces are non-existent. But more importantly, there is no investigative journalism to inform the public. WLKY-TV touts itself as doing investigative journalism, but, in reality, it doesn’t. WAVE-TV tries to do community service investigating local scam and con artists. WHAS-TV hasn’t done any investigative journalism that I can recall. And The Courier-Journal’s investigative reporting leaves much to be desired. The only investigative journalism The C-J does is against Republican politicians.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.CorrectionLast week LEO ran a correction from a story in our Oct. 17 issue. Unfortunately, the correction of the correction was also wrong. To set the record straight, the proposed library tax — two/tenths of 1 percent of earned income — amounts to $2 for every $1,000 earned, or about $76 per year for those earning $38,000. LEO sincerely regrets both errors.Bristol Party-PooperIn the unlikely event that the Bristol were driven to bankruptcy because of its owner’s stubborn refusal to apologize to Cory Nett (see Oct. 10 and 24 LEO Erosia), nothing would make me happier than to act on Jeff Hybarger’s suggestion that I throw a slumber party for its employees and management.In fact, Bristol survival notwithstanding, I would be delighted to host an all-nighter to introduce its employees and management to the amazing kids with cerebral palsy, autism and other lesser-known syndromes, whom I work with as a speech-therapist.Between bobbing for apples and “Happy Feet,” their parents could help make clearer why what happened to Cory and why the crappy treatment people with disabilities and differences have to confront every day is a big deal.We’d sip hot chocolate listening to descriptions of what it’s like to sit by a child’s hospital bed hoping that his next surgery won’t kill him. We’d paint our nails hearing stories of near pink slips because of work missed for endless doctors’ appointments, and about the constant battles with insurance companies to get services and equipment the kids need merely to survive, and so on.Then over light-as-a-feather, stiff-as-a-board, Bristol management and employees could hear how it feels, after trying so hard to live the most normal life possible, to meet up with a Neanderthal who tells you to move to the back or get out of a public place because you sound or look different.So come on, Bristol, let’s party!Jenny Thrasher, Louisville

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.Look to the LegislatureCandidates for Kentucky governor continue to trade barbs and raise questions about the other’s ethical standards and purported lapses, ratcheting up the issue of ethics in these dwindling days of the election. Lost in the debate, however, is the fact that there is an opportunity within the legislative process to address these very issues.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.

Erosia

LEO welcomes letters that are brief (250 words max) and thoughtful. Ad hominem attacks will be ignored, and we need your name and a daytime phone number. Send snail mail to EROSIA, 640 S. Fourth St., Louisville, Ky. 40202. Fax to 895-9779 or e-mail to leo@leoweekly.com. We may edit for length, grammar and clarity.