Issue August 27, 2014

Staffpicks

1.

<theater>

Aug. 29 – Sept. 7

“The Importance ?of Being Earnest”

Kentucky Center, MeX Theater

501 W Main St., 584-7777

kentuckycenter.org

$16; 8 p.m. 

There is no more enchanting and outrageous 19th century playwright than Oscar Wilde, and his witty assault on prudish convention is as funny and relevant today as it was in 1895, when “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People” debuted in London. Wilde’s flouting of convention was all too much for Victorian England, and sadly this play was his last, as he was imprisoned for “gross indecency” at the height of its success. As of Yet Unnamed Theatre Company brings this comedy of manners to the Kentucky Center’s MeX Theater this weekend, and Wilde’s lampooning of social hypocrisy is sure to delight. The play is one scene of quote-worthy scintillating repartee after another. It’s Wilde at his best and nothing short of hilarious. —L. Snyder

 

2.

<festival>

Aug. 29 – 31

Vinyl Fest

Crowne Plaza

830 Phillips Lane

$15 – $20

I remember reading the liner notes to “The Rich Man’s Eight Track Tape” by seminal noise makers Big Black, where Steve Albini blasted the compact disc, likening it to, well, an eight track tape. For Albini and many audiophiles like him, vinyl is the absolute best medium for conveying music, and that tradition is celebrated this weekend at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. The second annual Vinyl Fest explores what it is to be a music lover in the 21st century, whether the  medium is vinyl or any otherwise, and features live performances by bands like Violet Knives, a guitar exhibit courtesy of Guitar Emporium, fan album art, and all sorts of music related ephemera. One highlight this year is the “On The Record” panel featuring a number of Louisville music luminaries like Ed Lutz, Mike Bucay and John Timmons, for a conversation about their take on local music culture. —Syd Bishop

 

3.

<book>

Friday, Aug. 29

Kevin Gibson 

Carmichael’s Books

2720 Frankfort Ave

Carmichaelsbookstore.com, 896-6950

Free; 7 p.m.

You should probably bring your proof-of-age to the bookstore Friday. Kevin Gibson, who’s written many a LEO piece on local food ‘n drink, is coming to Carmichael’s to spread the news about local brews — he’s the author of the just-published “Louisville Beer: Derby City History on Draft.” The man has warmed many a barstool in his time — but he has taken to his study with a professional curiosity and thoroughness that exceed his thirst. When asked about the historical beers he researched, he seems genuinely sad that there isn’t a real opportunity to compare today’s “trendy IPAs” to “one of the ‘XXX’ ales brewed in the late 1800s and early 1900s.” The book also delves into the sociological importance of beer and how it served as a staple of life for Louisvillians of generations past. By the way, did I mention that beer and brats will be on hand at the reading/signing?  —T.E. Lyons

 

4.

<undead>

Friday, Aug. 29

Zombie Walk

Corner of Eastern Parkway ?and Bardstown Rd.

Free; 8:29 p.m.

 Just in time for the waxing of the great zombie zeitgeist, the Louisville Zombie Walk returns for the 11th time on 8/29 at 8:29. A perfect opportunity for young Republicans, civil servants and Oracle DBAs to join a pop revolution for the nice, relaxing slide back down into oblivion. As it is, Max Brooks made his bucks and Brad Pitt took it to the “Pee-wee’s Big Adventure” level better than James Brolin could have ever done. Not much left to do at this point other than gather around the great quivering corpse of the ouroboros, poke it with a stick and threaten to wipe it on the closest pretty girl. However, I’m sure that we can squeeze a few more ducats and a little fun out of the old girl yet, so bring on the gore. Just remember to leave your brains at home. —L. Snyder

 

5.

<music>

Aug. 29 – 31

Befuddled Festival

Rustic Frog Environs

1720 Old River Rd., New Albany

rusticfrog.com, 812-590-2620

$25 – $45; 5 p.m., 21+

The Befuddled Festival has more to offer than a person should probably even consider in one weekend (or ever). It’s so hedonistic and sensationalistic that even reality TV couldn’t pass this one by and will be filming onsite.  Frostitution Bake Shop will be there too, along with Shack in the Back BBQ and other vendors to feed revelers all the way through a musical lineup ranging from Quiet Riot to the much anticipated reunion of Charlestown, IN., band Days of the New. DOTN are playing as part of their Full Circle tour after disbanding 16 years ago following their eponymous debut album and the No. 1 single “Touch, Peel and Stand.”  It’s the kind of band reunion fantasy rarely realized in rock and roll. And if that’s not enough, you can get a tattoo at this outdoor festival, try your luck at the stripper dunk tank, and gawk at contortionists, fire breathers and mud wrestlers.   —L. Snyder

 

6. 

<performance>

Aug. 29 – 31

Befuddled Festival

Rustic Frog Environs

1720 Old River Rd., New Albany

rusticfrog.com, 812-590-2620

$25 – $45; 5 p.m., 21+

The Befuddled Festival has more to offer than a person should probably even consider in one weekend (or ever). It’s so hedonistic and sensationalistic that even reality TV couldn’t pass this one by and will be filming onsite.  Frostitution Bake Shop will be there too, along with Shack in the Back BBQ and other vendors to feed revelers all the way through a musical lineup ranging from Quiet Riot to the much anticipated reunion of Charlestown, IN., band Days of the New. DOTN are playing as part of their Full Circle tour after disbanding 16 years ago following their eponymous debut album and the No. 1 single “Touch, Peel and Stand.”  It’s the kind of band reunion fantasy rarely realized in rock and roll. And if that’s not enough, you can get a tattoo at this outdoor festival, try your luck at the stripper dunk tank, and gawk at contortionists, fire breathers and mud wrestlers.   —L. Snyder

 

7.

<art>

Saturday, Aug. 30

‘METAL UP ?YOUR EYE IV’

OPEN Gallery

2801 S. Floyd St.

Free; 7 p.m.

“Want to know what fearsome and provocative look like? Want to be surprised?”  With those words, Eric “Rico” Rakutt has thrown down the gauntlet – again. Rakutt and William David Pollard have organized the latest “METAL UP YOUR EYE,” their cross-pollination of metal music and art that has resulted in an exhibition for both. Rakutt explains that they want people “to check out some art which could be put into a metal context but isn’t your typical metal art from people who are not your typical metal fans.” The artists in the show are Pollard, Rakutt, Scott Webb, Damon Thompson and Mark Puckett. Music is the “DJing” Styles of Tom Haile from 28:48 Records and live performances by Asm A Tik and The Mighty Auroch. —Jo Anne Triplett

 

8.

<festival>

Saturday, Aug. 30

‘METAL UP ?YOUR EYE IV’

OPEN Gallery

2801 S. Floyd St.

Free; 7 p.m.

“Want to know what fearsome and provocative look like? Want to be surprised?”  With those words, Eric “Rico” Rakutt has thrown down the gauntlet – again. Rakutt and William David Pollard have organized the latest “METAL UP YOUR EYE,” their cross-pollination of metal music and art that has resulted in an exhibition for both. Rakutt explains that they want people “to check out some art which could be put into a metal context but isn’t your typical metal art from people who are not your typical metal fans.” The artists in the show are Pollard, Rakutt, Scott Webb, Damon Thompson and Mark Puckett. Music is the “DJing” Styles of Tom Haile from 28:48 Records and live performances by Asm A Tik and The Mighty Auroch. —Jo Anne Triplett

 

9. 

<art>

Saturday, Aug. 30

‘METAL UP ?YOUR EYE IV’

OPEN Gallery

2801 S. Floyd St.

Free; 7 p.m.

“Want to know what fearsome and provocative look like? Want to be surprised?”  With those words, Eric “Rico” Rakutt has thrown down the gauntlet – again. Rakutt and William David Pollard have organized the latest “METAL UP YOUR EYE,” their cross-pollination of metal music and art that has resulted in an exhibition for both. Rakutt explains that they want people “to check out some art which could be put into a metal context but isn’t your typical metal art from people who are not your typical metal fans.” The artists in the show are Pollard, Rakutt, Scott Webb, Damon Thompson and Mark Puckett. Music is the “DJing” Styles of Tom Haile from 28:48 Records and live performances by Asm A Tik and The Mighty Auroch. —Jo Anne Triplett

 

10.

<music>

Monday, Sept. 1

Sir Richard Bishop

Dreamland

810 E. Market St.

dreamlandislouisville.org

$10; 7pm

Guitar nerds can rejoice this Monday as two of the finest improvisers out there, Sir Richard Bishop and Tashi Dorji, are performing at Dreamland on Labor Day. The beauty of any Sir Richard Bishop performance is the unpredictability that he brings to the table. Since his time with the Sun City Girls, Bishop has managed to make music that refuses to fit into any one box. One track may be a raga inspired drone, whereas the next may sound like a lost John Fahey track, but it always sounds born from the same brilliant mind. That he can have a career as sonically fractured, but wonderfully cohesive is a testament to his skill at his craft. Guitar improviser Tashi Dorji is also playing, touring now on behalf of his self-titled LP available on Hermit Hut Records. Expect the show to start on time, so get there at 7 p.m. and expect the unexpected.  —Syd Bishop

 

11.

<art>

Sept. 1 – 30

‘Coming Out: Artist’ by Ericka Holbert

Day’s Espresso & Coffee

1420 Bardstown Rd., 456-1170

Free

Art is personal, so personal that there’s a person who created it. Obvious, right? And there’s the chance that the artist might be scared to show his or her work publicly. Even Picasso was concerned how the public would perceive his revolutionary masterpiece “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.” So we should appreciate photographer Ericka Holbert admitting she’s afraid to come out as an artist. “I know plenty of people that have a coming out story,” she says. “This time is different from when I first came out at 15. Then I was scared, this time, petrified … It is important to me to remember how terrifying times of discovery can be whether you are a 15-year-old lesbian or a 34-year-old fledgling artist.” 

A reception will be on Saturday, Sept. 6 from 6-9 p.m. —Jo Anne Triplett

 

12.

<theater>

Sept. 2 – 21

Love’s Labour’s Lost

Actors Theatre of Louisville

316 W. Main St.

Actorstheatre.org, 584-1205

$25 – $45; 7:30 p.m. 

Thank God someone is doing a Shakespeare production other than “Midsummer Night’s Dream” or “Romeo and Juliette.” I’m sick and tired of the excuses, “it’s a classic” or “we want a production people can connect with.” Get over it! If good old Uncle Billy Bard was still with us, I’m sure he’d agree. I’m going to see “Love’s Labour’s Lost” at Actors. Know why? Even if it is one of these reimagined interpretations, it’s Shakespeare, it’s awesome and it’s more than likely I will never get another chance in my life to see any incarnation of this early Shakespeare comedy. Three guys swearing off girls for three years of fasting and study — what a setup! Sounds like the setting for an Elizabethan “Hangover.” “These are barren tasks, too hard to keep, Not to see ladies, study, fast, not sleep!” (1.1.48)  ?—L. Snyder

 

<art>

Through Oct. 25

‘Discovering the Earth: African Pottery from the Speed’s Collection’ 

Local Speed/Speed Art Museum 

822 E. Market St.

speedmuseum.org, 634-2700

The display space in Speed Art Museum’s Local Speed may be small but its aspirations are big, with a tenacity to show items rarely, if ever, seen by the public. That’s the case with its latest exhibition, “Discovering the Earth: African Pottery from the Speed’s Collection.” The 17 pieces of pottery originated in locations across the continent, from Nigeria to South Africa. All of the hand-built earthenware on display was created in a traditional way of pit firing in brush bonfires. Expert Douglas Dawson, who gifted the pieces to the museum, says the vessels “blur those distinctions between fundamental utilitarian objects, ritual objects and ceremonial objects.” —Jo Anne Triplett